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Deep Brain Stimulation

 

23
Which Patients are Eligible and What is the Selection Process? Patients are first seen by a movement disorders neurologist for a detailed neurological evaluation. The neurologist will try to determine if the dystonia is primary (meaning that it is not related to a degenerative disease or caused by damage to the brain from another cause) or secondary. It is also important to the n...

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Retta Beery posted on October 23, 2010 Article Rating
22
What Are the Surgical Risks and Programming Side Effects? Surgical risks including bleeding in the brain causing stroke is approximately 1-2% per lead. Patients can develop temporary or permanent neurological deficits from this bleeding, the severity of which depends on where the bleeding occurs and its extent. Neurological deficits can include difficulty speaking, walking, swallowing, numbness, ...

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Retta Beery posted on October 22, 2010 Article Rating
20
What is the Difference Between DBS For Dystonia and DBS For Parkinson’s Disease and Essential Tremor? The surgical technique and pre-operative medical assessment and post-operative care for DBS surgery are similar in all these disorders, however, there are some differences. Most notably the response to programming is different in dystonia. In Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor...

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Retta Beery posted on October 20, 2010 Article Rating
20
What Types of Dystonia Can DBS Improve? The FDA has approved DBS for primary dystonia for patients age seven or older. Primary (or idiopathic) dystonia is dystonia that is not due to a secondary cause such as stroke, cerebral palsy, tumor, trauma, infection, multiple sclerosis, medications, or a neurodegenerative disease. Many of the primary dystonias are believed to be hereditary and may be du...

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Retta Beery posted on October 20, 2010 Article Rating
20
What Is DBS? DBS is a therapy that was originally developed for the treatment of tremor in patients with Parkinson’s disease or essential tremor. DBS is considered a less invasive alternative to lesion therapy. Instead of irreversible lesions, electrical stimulation is used to affect brain activity in specific regions that are abnormal in patients with movement disorders allowing the brai...

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Retta Beery posted on October 20, 2010